Wednesday, 23 September 2020

An extraordinary event took place on Thursday (December 12, 2019) in The Hague, the Netherlands. An  International Court of Justice (ICJ) panel wound up the first phase of a legal process aimed at determining whether Myanmar committed an act of genocide against the Rohingya ethnic minority. It is the first step toward justice for the Rohingya people: our world’s longest-suffering and most persecuted people.

In August 2017, under the pretext of counterterrorism operation, the Buddhist-dominated Myanmar military launched a genocidal campaign that killed tens of thousands of Rohingya Muslims and drove nearly a million of them into the neighboring Bangladesh.

Read more: Suu Kyi – the Bama Supremacist

By Habib Siddiqui

I have repeatedly said that genocide never happens suddenly. It's planned over a long period of time by perpetrators that require support top-down so that it becomes a national project to eliminate the targeted group. Such sinister initiative requires the support from evil intellectuals [1] (the likes of Julius Streicher [2]of the Nazi campaign in Germany) and financiers who must propagate with their intellects and finances to create enthusiasm within the larger executing community.

Read more: Stopping Genocide

By Dr. Habib Siddiqui

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines Xenophobia as – fear and hatred of strangers or foreigners or of anything that is strange or foreign. As can be seen, for xenophobia there are two main objects of the phobia (fear). The first is a population group present within a society, which is not considered part of that society. Often they are recent immigrants, but xenophobia may be directed against a group which has been present for centuries. This form of xenophobia can draw out or facilitate hostile and violent reactions, such as mass expulsion of immigrants, or in the worst case, genocide. The second form of xenophobia is primarily cultural, and the objects of the phobia are cultural elements which are considered alien or foreign.

Read more: Julius Streicher and his relevance in today’s Burma